Pet Food – The Basics

A dog is a man’s best friend. You do everything you can to maintain your optimum health. Doesn’t your best friend deserve the same? Your dog is an active (rather the most active) member of your family and needs the same, if not more attention to health and nutrition as you do, to stay healthy, and live longer.

After all it’s very easy to get lost in a big pet store. The sea of products that we have today, aisle after aisle is very confusing and also time consuming. However keeping your dog healthy need not be a career option for you. All we need to use is a little commonsense and good information regarding the breed and age of your dog.

Let’s divide the dogs into two categories – small & adult.

For Small Dogs & Puppies

It has long been established and proven that small dogs have a different metabolism as compared to large dogs, due to physiologic effect of their body mass. For ex., Great Dane weighing 100 pounds needs to consume about 23 calories per pound of body weight Pomeranian weighing 6 pounds needs to consume 47 calories per pound of body weight every day-more than twice as much!

As owner of a small dog, you need to be certain that your dog’s energy needs are being satisfied. Be sure to choose a diet that’s been formulated properly with optimal balance of highly digestible nutrients. Digestibility determines how much your dog can actually utilize each nutrient in a diet.
Puppies require almost twice or thrice as much food as adult dogs per pound of weight. To keep up their energy levels, they have to be fed as frequently as three to four times till they are six months of age.

Diet is always the key to raising your children or puppies. The diet should be balanced, nutrient rich, should contain high levels of phosphorous and calcium and be highly digestible. It should also contain high-quality proteins. This would ensure that the puppy develops strong bones, muscle and tissue.

For Adult Dogs

Your dog like you needs a combination of fats, carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, minerals, and water in a balanced diet to meet their daily needs. A lot of dog food bags claim they are in themselves complete food. This ends up as null if the nutrients cannot be absorbed by your dog’s system. Major companies take great care in this aspect by trying to provide the nutrients in an absorbable form.

Dog foods must also consist of mineral and vitamin supplements in a balanced form. The proportions should be accurate so that they do not interfere with each other in your dogs system. This would provide maximum benefit to your dog. If the food consists of one ingredient in overdose and the other in lower doses, it could have an adverse affect on your dogs health.

Top 5 Best Gifts For Your Pets

Most individuals or families view their pets as a member of the family as well. That said there is no reason why they should not be included in birthdays, Christmas or any other holiday for that matter. It’s a special day for them as well and it should be celebrated. So what are you going to get for your feline friend on their birthday? Why not consider some of these popular ideas which are sure to excite your pet on their special day:

1. Pet Carrier – Your pet will love this gift! A pet carrier is a bag large enough to allow room for you pet. Your pet then sits in the carrier while you tote them around town. Imagine how excited they would be to go everywhere and never have to walk a step. These items can cost anywhere from $20 to thousands of dollars depending on the style, make and size of the bag.

2. Pet Clothes – Just as humans like clothes for the birthdays, pets do as well. They like dressing up and they also like sweaters to keep them warm in the winter. There are many places to buy clothing for your pet and they can cost as little as $10 or as much as thousands depending on your preferences and the amount of money you are willing to spend.

3. Tasty Treats – Every pet will love the gift of food. Their favorite treats are sure to make them feel special on their birthday (or other occasion) and this can end up being a very inexpensive, yet effective, gift.

4. Pet ID Tags – These items can be personalized with their favorite designs or characters but what’s most beneficial about these gifts is that if they get lost they will be brought back to you. That would probably be the best gift they could wish for.

5. Manicure/Pedicure – I know this sounds crazy but it really isn’t. Think about how much walking your pets do on their paws. Just like we like manicures and pedicures, your pets will appreciate the special treatment as well. Keep in mind this will only work for animals with paws and most likely is only best for those of female nature.

There are many other great gift ideas for your pets. It’s up to you to decide which is best for them but also within your budget. Many individuals spend unreasonable amounts on gifts for their pets but you really don’t need anything extravagant, just something small to let them know you care. In the end it’s the thought that counts…not the price tag.

The Myth of 100% Complete Processed Pet Foods

Every day, people by the millions pour food from a package into their pet’s bowl. Day in and day out, meal after meal, pets get the same fare. This strange phenomenon is not only widely practiced, but done by loving owners who believe they are doing the right thing. Why? Certainly because it is convenient, but also because the labels state that the food is “complete and balanced,” “100% complete,” or that the food has passed various analytical and feeding test criteria.

Furthermore, manufacturers and even veterinarians counsel pet owners about not feeding other foods such as table scraps because of the danger of unbalancing these modern processed nutritional marvels. The power of the message is so great that pet owners en masse do every day to their pets what they would never do to themselves or their children -offer the same processed packaged food at every meal.

Think about it: Our world is complex beyond comprehension. It is not only largely unknown; it is unknowable in the “complete” sense. In order for nutritionists and manufacturers to produce a “100% complete and balanced” pet food, they must first know 100% about nutrition. However, nutrition is not a completed science. It is, in fact, an aggregate science, which is based upon other basic sciences, such as chemistry, physics, and biology. But since no scientist would argue that everything is known in chemistry or physics or biology, how can nutritionists claim to know everything there is to know about nutrition, which is based upon these sciences? This is the logical absurdity of the “100% complete and balanced” diet claim. It is the reason a similar venture to feed babies a “100% complete” formula has turned out to be a health disaster.

Claiming that anything is 100% is like claiming perfection, total knowledge, and absolute truth. Has pet nutrition really advanced that far? Does a chemist make such a claim? A physicist? Doctor? Professor? Did Einstein, Bohr, Pasteur, Aristotle, Plato, or any of the greatest minds in human history make such claims? No. Has the science of pet nutrition advanced to the point where everything is known about the physiology, digestion and biochemistry of animals, or that everything is known about their food?

Certainly not.

The fact of the matter is that the “100% complete” claim is actually “100% complete” guesswork. At best, one could say that such a claim is the firm possibility of a definite maybe.

Each time regulatory agencies convene to decide how much of which nutrients comprise “100% completeness,” debate always ensues and standards usually change. This not only proves that what they claimed before was not “100% complete,” but this should also make us highly suspicious about what they now claim to be “100% complete.”

Additionally, consider that in order to determine the minimum requirement for a certain nutrient – say protein – all other nutrients used in the feeding trials must be adequate and standardized. Otherwise, if vitamin E, for example, is in excess or is deficient, how would you know if the results of the study were because of the effects of protein or due to something amiss with the level of vitamin E?

If the minimum requirements for all 26+ essential nutrients were all set and absolutely etched in stone, then there would be no problem. But they aren’t. They are constantly changing. This means each time any nutrient requirement is changed, all test results for all other nutrients using the wrong minimum for this nutrient would then be invalid. Most nutritionists simply ignore this conundrum, feeling like cowboys trying to lasso an octopus – there are just too many loose ends. But they continue to perpetuate the “100% complete” myth, and excuse themselves by saying they make adjustments when necessary.

The point is, don’t believe the claim on any commercially prepared pet (or human) food that it is “100% complete and balanced.” It is a spurious unsupported boast, intended to build consumer trust and dependence on commercial products – not create optimal health.

Unfortunately most people think animal feeding is a mystery. It is not. Animal nutrition is not a special nutritional science to which common sense human nutrition principles cannot be applied. Use the same common sense in feeding your pets that you use for feeding your family. Nutrition is not about some special ingredient or the absence of some boogeyman ingredient. Fresh foods fed in variety are always superior to processed food artifacts.
If you feed processed foods, use discernment since just about anyone can create a commercial pet food. The pet food industry has hundreds of brands with officious and beguiling labels, all stamped with the approval of the FDA, USDA, State Feed Regulatory Agencies and the American Association of Feed Control Officials (AAFCO). Business profiteers and the occasional movie star are the most common force behind the labels. All one needs is a little money and they can go to any number of toll manufacturers and have them slightly modify a shelf formula. Dress it all up with a fancy package, a clever brochure and some advertising and voilà, another brand is added to the 20-billion-dollar pet food industry.

Nutrition is serious health business. The public is not well served by exclusively feeding products from companies without any real commitment to health … or knowledge of how to even achieve that.

For the past 25 years I have been a lonely voice in the wilderness trying to get people to understand the deadly health consequences of feeding processed pet foods exclusively. People want convenience in a bag and the industry wants the flow of billions to continue uninterrupted. In the meantime the scientific literature offers compelling proof that millions of animals have been maimed and died as a result of feeding thoroughly tested “100% complete” foods with the full imprimatur of government regulation. (Exactly the same thing that abounds in the FDA-pharmaceutical industry.) Examples of pet food disasters include dilated cardiomyopathy from taurine deficiency, potassium imbalances, fatty acid and carnitine deficiencies and numerous other problems that would be expected on a steady diet of dead, devitalized, carbohydrate-based processed foods. Moreover, the whole panoply of human chronic degenerative diseases such as cancer, obesity, arthritis, autoimmunities, dental deterioration and organ failure are at epidemic levels in the pet population … as should be expected on such a diet.

Not only is feeding the same processed food day in and day out a formula for disease, it is a cruelty to our pets. We take them from their interesting and active wild setting and confine them. That is one thing, but to not even offer them interesting natural meal variety is really quite inexcusable. The answer, like everything else good in life, is a little attention and common sense. Knowledge is the best beginning point.
To learn more, obtain a copy of my book, The Truth About Pet Foods. I will also see to it that you get a free copy of my CD, “The Thinking Person’s Master Key to Health,” and the brochure, “How to Apologize to Your Pet,” which will give you specific guidelines for how to prepare meals and treats to achieve Optimal Pet Health.

Vaccinations Cause Vaccinosis – Your Pet is Being Harmed

Annual Vaccinations for Your Dog?

Are they really necessary? – In a word, NO!

You probably receive an annual reminder from your vet that your dog is due for his/her annual checkup and vaccinations. I do.

But I don’t have my dogs vaccinated any more.

For years I was hoodwinked into believing that vaccinations were essential to my dogs’ health. Why else would my vet tell me my dogs needed an annual booster vaccination shot?

Why indeed.

I learned the answer when, after careful research, I decided not to expose my dogs to what I believe is unnecessary, and potentially dangerous, toxins, any more.

I received the letter from my vet as usual, advising that my dogs’ annual checkup and vaccinations were due.

I made an appointment and arrived ready to do battle. I advised the vet that I had decided not to have my dogs vaccinated any more. She said “Fine.”

That’s right – after years of leading me to believe that these vaccinations were essential to my dogs’ wellbeing, the vet agreed that they were not in fact necessary at all! She went on to stress the importance of still bringing the dogs in for their annual physical checkup (which was what I was doing, and certainly intended to continue to do).

So that’s why we’re all told that our dogs need annual vaccinations – it’s simply a ploy to get us in so our dogs can be given a physical. Why not just tell us how important these annual checkups are instead of slowly but surely poisoning our dogs with these vaccines?

I don’t have the answer to that, but I can tell you I was speechless.

I’ve now found out that all across America a new protocol for vaccinating dogs has now been issued and is slowly making its way to vets. (I haven’t been able to locate a similar protocol for Australia, but I’m sure it’s in the pipeline). This protocol does not recommend any vaccinations for dogs beyond 1 year of age!

Make sure you ask your vet next time a vaccination has been recommended for your dog – it this really necessary? And if you’re not satisfied with the answer, consider getting a second opinion from another vet.

Protecting the Smallest Member of Your Family: A Step-by-step Guide to Pet Insurance

Let’s face it – Fido and Fluffy are an important part of your family. Do you want to have to assign a dollar value to them if they become sick or injured?

That may well be the case if you don’t have pet health insurance. Rising veterinary costs mean that pet owners can pay hundreds – and even thousands – of dollars for their pets’ health problems. As the bills stack up, uninsured pet owners must determine how much they are willing to spend on their animal friend. It can be a heartbreaking decision to make.

Much like insurance for health, cars and homes, pet insurance helps people put a little money away now to avoid a major payout later. Coverage and cost vary, so it’s important to thoroughly research the options if you decide to insure your pet.

Step one: Determine if Pet Insurance is Right for You

When people decide to get a pet, they often don’t consider how they will deal with the inevitable unexpected illnesses or accidents. Keeping a pet indoors by no means eliminates all the hazards. They can still swallow foreign objects, ingest a poison or injure themselves. As well, living indoors does not make a pet immune to disease and infection – particularly those that are common to their breed. Pets with access to the outdoors have even more opportunities to pick up a disease or get hurt.

Don’t have a dog or cat? Insurance companies are starting to offer plans that meet the needs of a variety of pet owners. Some now offer coverage for birds and exotic animals.

Not all owners are good candidates for pet insurance, however. Pet insurance is ideal for owners who deeply love their pets and are willing to spend a significant amount of money to keep them healthy and extend their life. They buy their cherished companions the best food and care they can afford, sometimes even putting their pets’ needs before their own. For this type of owner, pet insurance can be a smart investment that can prevent considerable costs and bring peace of mind.

Pet insurance is not a good investment for owners who don’t have a strong emotional tie to their pet. Owners who would rather have their pets euthanized than spend money on vet bills are not good candidates for pet insurance.

Step two: Decide What Type of Coverage You Want

Most pet owners will weigh two main considerations when shopping for pet insurance: budget and coverage. Peace of mind can also be an important factor, but far more difficult to quantify.

Pet health insurance is still relatively new in the United States and Canada, so the options available are fewer than for other forms of insurance. That said, North American pet owners can choose from a variety of coverage choices, ranging from injury/accident-only to all-inclusive.

As with all insurance products, the cost of pet insurance increases as the coverage improves. As a pet owner, you must decide what is the right balance between affordability and the care you want for your pet.

– Coverage

When choosing pet insurance coverage, first consider what kind of insurance customer you are. Do you prefer all-inclusive coverage that pays for everything from routine checkups and vaccinations to accidents and chronic illnesses, or are you comfortable with a lesser degree of coverage that just kicks in during emergencies? Perhaps you prefer a flexible plan that offers discounts on a wide range of services, from veterinary care to training. This decision will lay the groundwork for your final choice.

Some issues to consider:

* Make sure to check for coverage of pre-existing conditions as well as breed-specific genetic ailments, such as hip dysplasia for large dogs. Some plans refuse to cover these conditions.

* Some plans place limits on annual, per-incident, per-illness or lifetime costs.

* How old is your pet? Coverage usually starts at eight weeks, but some plans won’t cover pets over a certain age (usually between six and 10 years old, depending on the breed, type of animal and other factors).

– Cost

Payment options for pet insurance include flat fees or deductibles and/or co-payments. Not surprisingly, plans with lower monthly premiums come with higher deductibles and/or larger co-payments.

Some issues to consider:

* Insurance premiums are affected by the age, health and breed of your pet, as well as the type of animal.

* Some plans offers discounts for multiple pets.

* Plans generally require customers to pay the vet bill first and then submit receipts for reimbursement.

* Find out if the insurance premiums will increase as your pet ages.

* Depending on the plan you choose, the monthly premiums can range from less than $10 to about $40.

Step three: Choose an Insurer
You’ve determined what you can afford to spend and the amount of pet insurance coverage you want.

Before selecting an insurer, here are some final considerations:

* Make a list of your questions and priorities in advance. Make sure to answer or check off each item when reviewing plan options.

* Research the insurer thoroughly. Review its website and sales materials, read its testimonials, talk to other pet owners and look for on-line reviews. How long has the company been in business? Are its customers satisfied? Make sure you feel comfortable about everything you hear or read.

* Compare the plan’s benefit schedule with your vet’s fees to determine to what degree the plan will cover the actual treatment costs.

* Find out how quickly the insurance company reimburses customers’ claim payments and if it has claim deadlines.

* Read the fine print. Make sure you completely understand the plan’s benefits and, more importantly, the limitations. If something isn’t clear, ask – and get the answer in writing. Otherwise, you might find you don’t have the coverage you need if an accident occurs.

* Start a file for your pet. Use it for all receipts and insurance paperwork so you can keep on top of your claims and make sure you are maximizing your insurance investment.

Your responsibility as a pet owner doesn’t end with food, shelter and affection. Pet health insurance can give the smallest member of your family a longer and healthier life – and provide you with more time to enjoy the unconditional love it so willingly offers to you.

Starting a Home-Based Pet Related Business

If you’re contemplating the idea of starting a home-based business here are some facts you should know:

·According to the Small Business Administration, home-based businesses account for over half of all the businesses in the United States.

·Each year thousands of aspiring entrepreneurs launch a part-time home business to supplement their existing income or to test a new business idea.

·There are two industries that have shown exponential growth over the past years, and they are (in no particular order):

1.The Wellness Industry

2.The Pet Industry

Now that you know that, and that we’ve agreed you’re a pet lover, it’s time to choose the right pet business for you. You will have to ask yourself some basic questions such as:

1.What are my strengths?
Do you like to work directly with people, or do you prefer to work alone?

2.Do I want to work from home or at home?
Some home-based businesses require you to hit the road, while others let you work without ever leaving home.

3.Do I have certain skills that make me stand out from the crowd?
Can you bake the most delicious cookies in town? Are you a whiz with your camera? Does every pet you encounter just love you?

4.How much can I afford to invest?
Do you have all the necessary equipment to operate your business? Can you start operating on a shoestring and then add as your business grows?

After you have answered those questions is time to search for more information on your desired business idea, you will find a lot of information online. Some ideas are:

·Aromatherapy and Natural Products for Pets

·Poop Scoop Business

·Dog Bakery Business

·Pet Grooming

·Pet Sitting Business

·Pet Photography

Of all of them, my personal favorite is the first one because it merges the two largest growing industries together, Wellness and Pets. BINGO, you have a winner!

Do your homework, find out which home-based pet business best suits you and start today, you will find it to be a rewarding way of earning a living because not only your customers will thank you

Aromatherapy for Pets

Pets can enjoy the therapeutic effects of aromatherapy as
much as humans can. Aside from possibly eliminating bad
odors and giving your pet a pleasant perfume, essential
oils also serve many practical functions such as boosting
your pet’s immune system, fighting off bacteria and
viruses, preventing the growth of yeasts and molds and
repelling insects.

Aromatherapy is used by enthusiasts, groomers and pet
salons to trea mild ailments such as skin inflammations,
itchy skin ear infections, rashes, bad breath, flatulence
and motions sickness. Psychologically, certain oils also
have a calming or relaxing effect on animals. For example
lavender oil not only helps kitties repel insects but it
also makes them feel sleepy or content. Roman chamomile
can be used to treat an ear infection as well as soothe the
nerves of a dog in pain.

Essential oils are also frequently used as home remedies.
However before you attempt to use aromatherapy on your own
pets, keep in mind that essential oils are always diluted
before they are applied to a pet’s skin or sprayed on their
coat. Almond oil, olive oil and jojoba oil are common base
oils to which a few drops of the essential oil is added.
Usually all that is needed is about one ounce of the base
oil combined with two to three drops of the essential oil.

Essential oils can also be diluted in a spray bottle and
misted onto the pet or the pet’s bedding. You can simply
dilute a few drops in distilled water or you can use water
and a mixture of aloe, witch hazel or cider vinegar. The
traditional recommendation is to use 20 to 30 drops of oil
per eight ounces of liquid. Any less might not be
effective and any more might be toxic to the pet.

Oils can also be diluted in vodka or brandy and dabbed on
the bottom of the pet’s paws or on an acupressure point
such as the tips of the ears. This is the technique to use
if you are dealing with a panicky pet. Never feed your pet
alcohol or essential oil directly.

Essential oils are also effective flea and tick repellents
and are nearly as effective as sprays and powders that
contain a lot of toxic chemicals. Oils such as peppermint,
citronella, lavender, eucalyptus, lemon, geranium, bay and
myrrh have been components of herbal flea sprays and flea
collars for many years. You can easily make your own flea
and tick spray by combining about 25 drops of any of these
oils into eight ounces of water. Shake the mixture well
and spray it on your pet, being careful to shield its eyes
from mist. This mixture can also be sprayed anywhere that
you suspect there may be a breeding bug infestation.

When using essential oils it is also essential for you to
remember that a dog or cat’s sense of smell is much more
acute than our own. Signs that an aromatherapy treatment is
too overwhelming for your pet are tearing eyes, sneezing,
pacing or whining. Cats may lick themselves excessively and
dogs may rub their head on the ground in order to escape
the smell. Many pets also have allergies to essential oils.
For instance, chamomile is related to the ragweed plant,
which is a common allergen for both pets and humans. This
is why it is so important to use a mild solution at first
and use your powers of observation the first few times you
use an essential oil mixture on a pet.

Easy Tips for Healthy Pets

Do you want a long and healthy life for your pets?

There are things in our pets‘ environments that
can rob them of precious health and long life. I’m
not talking about cars accidents and mean kids
in the neighborhood. I’m talking about things
inside the home. Things like:

1) Food
Food is meant to be good tasting and good for you.
The same applies to our pets. Unfortunately, both
people food and pet food are full of stuff. And
most of this stuff isn’t found growing naturally.

Manufacturers have taken the place of growers and
cooks. To make foods taste better things are
added.

To make foods last forever on the store shelf,
things are added. For example, tomatoes are now
designed to look good after a long trip to the
store. They are not grown to be nutritious and
safe.

On TV we see reports about how additives,
preservatives and stuff are making our children
unhealthy. The same thing applies to our pets’
food.

Preservatives keep food fresh by altering the
DNA of the creatures living on the food.
What do these preservatives do to the DNA of the
child or pet eating them?

See where I’m going?

Altered hormones, cell mutations (cancer),
sickness !!!

The only way to minimize this stuff in our pet’s
food is to make the food ourselves. There are
recipes all over the web for the kitchen literate.

Most people don’t have the time to make their
pet’s food and treats. There are places where
good wholesome pet foods can be purchased.

2) Chemicals in the home

What do you use to clean your counter tops? Where
do you store it? Can your pet get to it? Can your
kids get to it?

A large number of children and pets are poisoned
each year because household products are very
attractive to inquisitive minds. There are a lot
of products on the market that won’t harm anyone
if swallowed.

We had one 6 month old child find and swallow
a cleanser. The parents didn’t think he was old
enough to get to the open bottle.

3) Mold in the home
Most people consider mold in the home an
unattractive nuisance. But it can cause allergic
reactions in children AND pets.

One house we investigated had two sick, allergic,
asthmatic kids. But they called us in when the dog
started sneezing.

Does your pet sleep in the laundry room? Lots of
mold there too.

Mold can cause:

* Allergies,

* sinus problems,

* itching,

* stomach problems,

* hyperactivity,

* skin and hair problems.

This list applies both to kids and pets.

But be careful about what you use to clean away
the mold. Bleach doesn’t kill mold but does burn
sensitive lungs.

Don’t use any product that your store owner or
pest control person won’t drink in front of you

Five Fast Facts About the Cavalier King Charlies Spaniel

Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are not cheap. On average you can expect to pay $2,000-$3,000 for one.

However, if you’ve socked away your “puppy fund” and are considering buying a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, or “Cav” as enthusiasts call them, there are five things you might not know. Before you fall under the spell of the big eyes and floppy ears, a few tips from a Cav owner…

1) While Cavs slow down as they age, don’t take this as an excuse not to walk the dog. They love walks, even though they may seem to sleep most of the time when at home. As your Cav turns seven or eight, regular walks become more important, and the exercise will keep you moving too.

2) Cavs get knots in their fur more easily than any breed I’ve ever known with the exception of the Maltese–I co-owned one with my grandmother and kept its coat short. Cav coats are naturally short on top, long around the paws, tail, throat, ears, and belly, which is where the tangles appear. They also get leaves and grass stuck in their fur, especially in the long tail. However, a good rinse in the sink will take care of the grass and leaves. As for the tangles, a Love Glove, available from pet stores, is gentler on the Cav’s sensitive nerve endings than other dog brushes.

3) Cavs are easily distractible and will chase after rabbits and birds like bloodhounds. Be aware of this now. Invest in obedience training from the start. However, they’re also terrific at alerting you to noises at night.

4) I call the Cav eyes “hypnotic eyes” because once they look at you, you reach in a trance for a morsel from your plate or for the Beggin’ Strips. Instead, repeat this mantra after me: vet bills, vet bills, vet bills…

5) Cavs are the most sensitive dog on the planet. In bed with the flu? Just try and pry that dog away. Sad? Your Cav will lick your tears away. Feeling slightly blue or have the sniffles? The dog will be right by your side. Priceless

Immune System Booster For Your Pets

Many chronic diseases commonly seen in pets result from immune suppression. Diabetes, allergies, breathing difficulties, thyroid disease, inflammatory bowel diseases, recurrent ear infections, and even cancer, are all examples of an immune system gone wrong.

Some of these diseases can be treated by conventional medicine, or by natural remedies such as homeopathy, but many are lifetime conditions, and some are fatal. Conventional or natural treatments can be effective, but usually treatment is slow, especially where the disease is well established. Transfer factors can significantly shorten the course of the treatment, by giving a much needed balancing effect to your pet’s immunity.

So what are Transfer factors, I hear you ask?

Transfer factors are a set of messaging molecules that convey immune information within the immune system. Transfer factors also carry immune information from one individual’s immune system to another individual. They help the immune system recognize, respond to, and remember invading organisms which threaten optimimum health.

It was initially thought that Transfer factors were only present in blood. But it was later realised that they’re also present in colostrum. More recently it’s been found that Transfer factors are also in egg yolk.

All infant mammals (including human babies who were breastfed) receive colostrum from their mothers which helps educate and strengthen their naïve immune systems for the challenges of the time. Today, more than ever, we are exposed to new immune challenges. Strengthening our immune systems can be critical to lifelong health.

Suppression of the immune system can result in various illness and disease types including bacterial, mycobacterial, fungal, parasitic, viral, and cancer. Specific illnesses, diseases and conditions which can manifest as a result of your pet’s compromised immune system may include skin irritations, allergies, hot spots, continuous licking of paws or other body parts, skin lesions, and more serious conditions including epilepsy or other seizures.

Exposure to antibiotics, cortisone, vaccinations, almost all other drugs, flea treatments, worming treatments, chemical cleaners in the home, pesticides which find their way into your backyard every time it rains, and airborne pollutants, all cause an assault on your pet’s immune support system.

4Life Transfer Factor Research has developed a product which supports your pet’s immune system like no other. There are many good colostrum products available (and which are widely used to boost immunity), which have only 1/30 of the effectiveness of 4Life Transfer Factor Plus. 4Life Transfer Factor Plus contains Transfer factors sourced from bovine colustrum, avian eggs, and herbal extracts, and has been shown to boost immunity by 437 percent!

Compromise of your pet’s immunity may cause it to be either overactive or underactive. If it’s overactive, your pet may experience allergies, ear infections, diabetes, or hypothyroidism. In effect an overactive immune system may attack its own organs. Transfer factors act on an overactive immune system to balance the overactivity. An underactive immune system may result in mange, parasites, viral infections, or cancer. Transfer factors will boost an underactive immune system, thereby giving the immune system the capacity to overcome the disease condition.

Until relatively recently pet (and human) health was always approached by waiting for signs and symptoms of disease to occur, and then to counter them with toxic drugs which would either mask or knock out the symptoms. But in doing so, immunity was being affected adversely. This disease management regime is now being discarded by medical practitioners and veterinarians, particularly those who prefer a holistic approach. Instead of waiting until disease appears and establishes itself, sometimes with irreversible consequences, immunity optimization can prevent disease from occurring in the first place, and reduce the severity and duration when it does occur.

And immunity optimization can be achieved with the use of 4Life Transfer Factor. 4Life Transfer Factor deals with both bacterial and viral infections before they can cause disease. I highly recommend it for your pet.